Johnson Controls joins the climate change conversation

Share On
Share

In December 2015, Johnson Controls participated in the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris – the 21st Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21). With nearly 50,000 participants, COP21 aims to achieve a global agreement to keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius. Johnson Controls was one of many companies that represented the private sector and served as observers for the conference.

The Johnson Controls delegation was led by Grady Crosby, vice president, Public Affairs, and chief diversity officer; and Clay Nesler, vice president, Global Energy and Sustainability.

The Johnson Controls delegation discussed how our company maintains sustainability across the value chain in three ways:
  • Improving operational excellence and reducing the footprint of our own facilities 
  • Helping our suppliers become more energy efficient
  • Providing products that help our customers become more energy efficient, sustainable and competitive 
Clean energy panel
Crosby was featured on a panel discussion on clean energy hosted by one of our partners, the Business Council for Sustainable Energy. He discussed how government policies can increase adoption and investment in clean energy technologies.

“Since introducing our first product more than 130 years ago, an electric room thermostat, our customers have trusted us to provide products and services that use resources like energy efficiently and improve sustainability,” Crosby said. “From fuel-efficient batteries, to energy-efficient heating and cooling equipment, to distributed energy storage, we have a range of products that help customers reduce resource use and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

 Nesler also presented on several panels at the conference. In a media interview, he discussed the need for private sector involvement to address climate change.

“There isn’t enough public money in the world to make all the investments that we need to address climate mitigation and resiliency issues. We really need to unlock the power of the private sector and markets to be able to make these improvements," Nesler said. "The good news is energy efficiencies generally pay for themselves over time. It’s not a cost, it’s an investment.”

“Many successful companies systematically attack waste at all levels of their organization, work with suppliers to improve the eco-efficiency of their supply chain and develop new sustainable products and services for their customers. Like these other leading companies, we aspire to be innovative, resource efficient, operationally excellent and therefore fully embrace the transition to a sustainable, low-carbon economy," said President and Chief Executive Officer Alex Molinaroli.

CEO talks sustainability
During the event, President and Chief Executive Officer Alex Molinaroli published an article on sustainability on the World Economic Forum blog.

“Many successful companies systematically attack waste at all levels of their organization, work with suppliers to improve the eco-efficiency of their supply chain and develop new sustainable products and services for their customers,” Molinaroli said. “Like these other leading companies, we aspire to be innovative, resource efficient, operationally excellent and therefore fully embrace the transition to a sustainable, low-carbon economy.”

Johnson Controls was also featured in the CDP report highlighting our commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and energy use across our global supply chain. 

In addition, Johnson Controls is the industry lead industry partner for the UN SE4ALL Building Efficiency Accelerator, which was featured in a World Resources Institute blog

Featured commitments
Johnson Controls has set 2020 goals to make our operations more sustainable, including activities to reduce the emissions, energy, water and waste across our global facilities. Leading up to and during COP21, Johnson Controls emphasized its goals and commitments on energy intensity, greenhouse gas intensity, responsible policy engagement and low global warming potential refrigerants.

These goals and commitments included the following:
Share On
Share