Helping Stanford University drastically reduce water and energy use

Share On
Share

Stanford University cut its water use by 15 percent and is projected to save $420 million in operational costs thanks to a new central energy facility (CEF) developed with help from Johnson Controls. The new plant helps Stanford make substantial progress to meet California’s statewide goal to reduce water use by 25 percent.

The plant operates efficiently in any weather condition, thanks to ultra-efficient building technologies, including heat recovery chillers, hot and cold water thermal energy storage, and a patented smart technology system that uses weather and electricity pricing forecasts to optimize operations. The central plant system is a key component of the Stanford Energy System Innovations (SESI) – making the university one of the most energy-efficient research facilities in the world.

“Nothing goes to waste inside this facility. We are recycling heat that is typically released by cooling towers and putting it to good use to keep students and staff comfortable,” said Trent Nevill, vice president and general manager, Johnson Controls Building Efficiency. “All this is accomplished while helping Stanford reduce its carbon emissions by 50 percent compared to levels during the 1990s.”

Share On
Share