“Living Laboratory” demonstrates advanced energy storage technology

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Two older buildings at Ohio’s Case Western Reserve University are being transformed to model the energy grid of the future, with Johnson Controls distributed energy storage systems playing a vital role.

The Northern Ohio Building-to-Grid Integration Demonstration is testing tomorrow’s technology in real-world settings, in a project funded by the Department of Energy. The Case Western Reserve University buildings will serve as a laboratory for “transactive control,” the practice of constantly managing a building’s energy use and grid connections to optimize consumption.

An in-building L1000 distributed energy storage system from Johnson Controls, with a 65kWh output and 125kWh capacity, will help the Case Western Reserve University buildings make the most of an existing wind turbine as well as proposed solar power. The L1000 uses a modular array of lithium ion batteries, advanced controls and software to capture wind and solar power when it’s available, then release it on demand to meet building load and grid requirements.

The Case Western Reserve University buildings will serve as a laboratory for “transactive control,” the practice of constantly managing a building’s energy use and grid connections to optimize consumption.

In addition to smoothing the ups and downs of renewable energy sources, Johnson Controls distributed energy storage systems provide backup power and help shift energy use to reduce costs. The L1000 offers a small, flexible footprint, while the L2000 is a containerized solution that can be scaled up to serve a larger facility or an entire campus.

A second demonstration site is planned for the University of Toledo, along with testing through simulations at the NASA Glenn Research Centers.

Learn more about the Building-to-Grid Integration Demonstration by reading the following articles:

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